Tuesday, May 27, 2008

BOOK! The Marlowe-Shakespeare Connection: A New Study of the Authorship Question


By Samuel L. Blumenfeld

McFarland & Company
ISBN 978-0-7864-3902-7
368pp.
softcover 2008
Pre-order from Amazon, Barnes & Noble, mcfarlandpub.com, etc. Release date: June 30, 2008!


Description, from the publisher: "This book addresses the long-standing debate over the Shakespeare authorship problem and offers a daring solution: that the true author of the works attributed to Shakespeare was in fact poet and playwright Christopher Marlowe. The author suggests that Marlowe, supposedly killed in a tavern brawl in 1593, actually faked his own death in order to save himself from an inquisition and certain execution, then continued writing for several years under the pseudonym of William Shakespeare. Citing substantial and compelling evidence, the author outlines several hypotheses to support his case, including the theory that several top people in Queen Elizabeth’s government were involved in the plot to save Marlowe (who was reportedly a spy in the Secret Service.)"


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5 comments:

Camila said...

So this is the book we've been hearing about for so long! Sounds intriguing. Ideally, word will get out not only to scholars but also to a wider audience of curious inquirers. Only a few weeks ago, I had the opportunity to talk with an English professor at USF who was doing research on the Marlowe-Shakespeare question. She seemed entrenched in her loyalty to Shakespeare's traditional identity. But hopefully with this book, people will begin to seriously consider the Marlowe theory.

brian said...

This work advances the Marlowe theory from pieced-together speculations to a more evidence-backed position. Well done.

Christine said...

I'm getting the book!

Anonymous said...

enjoyed the book, learned a heck of a lot about Elizabethan history too.

Sam convinced me, it's Marlowe!

NickLjr said...

as compelling a case for Marlowe as I've read thus far, less fantastical than Hoffman's book